An Adventure of Faith is a Better Alternative

When Christ, who is our life, shall appear, then shall ye also appear with him in glory.”                                                                                                                                              (Col. 3:4)

When God connects with people of faith the result is unconventional.  A biblical-quality journey of faith is not interchangeable with worldly conventional normalcy…they are on two different levels…two different domains of reality.

Yes, it is blasphemy to claim to be the Son of God…but only because Jesus and His mission did not fit the worldly horizontal expectations of the leadership in Jerusalem and a large portion of the populace…who were told for centuries to expect a warrior/prophet king in the mold of a Moses or David or one of the judges, as messiah.

All of the humiliation of the inflexibly close-minded, stubbornly blind rejection of Jesus Christ as messiah is condensed down into the cross of Calvary.  But if we unpack it and spread it out backwards in reverse order leading up to Calvary, part of the rejection of Jesus is based upon a rejection of God-composed, risk-filled journey of faith life-scripts that begin with Abraham (Lk. 11:52; Jn. 8:39-40), starting way back in time in the 12th chapter of Genesis…the first book in the Bible.

The narrative stories of faith recorded in the Bible are at the core of Judaism in the Old Testament and Christianity in the New Testament.  A journey of faith like that of Abraham, Joseph, Moses, Joshua, Ruth, Samuel, David, Esther and Mordecai, Elijah, Jeremiah, and Daniel, to name only a few, is precisely how the new covenant least-to-the-greatest all get to know God personally.

A biblical-quality journey of faith has no parallels with world conventional thinking.  This is not a new interpretation of the Bible.  This is not some version of self-energized asceticism.  God displacing our ways with His higher ways in the real, concrete events and circumstances of the lives of believers is the core central theme in the biblical narrative stories of faith.  This concept of the cross of Christ in our lives is right there in plainly spoken words and action-examples throughout the Bible.

I particularly like the quote by G.K. Chesterton that Christianity has not been “tried and found wanting” but “found difficult and never tried.”[1]  Committed Christian discipleship, over time, leads to a manifestation of the positive fruits of the Spirit (Gal. 5:22-23) within the characters of Spirit-born and Spirit-led Christians.  A God-composed journey of faith is the best and highest route to take in all of human experience, even when this route involves a difficult and challenging good-works ministry to mankind in a particular area of need, or the outcome of outright persecution and possible martyrdom.

In other words, a biblical-quality, God-composed adventure of faith is a better alternative to the mediocrity of worldly conventional normalcy.

The reality is that a perfectly lived journey of faith as exemplified in the life and ministry of Jesus the divine Son of God, leads directly to the cross on Calvary Hill.  Jesus instructs His followers to pick up their crosses…not to shun or ignore the cross element in our journeys of faith.  God displacing our ways with His higher ways is the essence of the danger zone of a Christian life of faith.

 

 

 

[1] Patrick Glynn, God: The Evidence (New York: Three Rivers Press, 1999), 149.

Author: Barton Jahn

I work in building construction as a field superintendent and project manager. I have four books published by McGraw-Hill on housing construction (1995-98) under Bart Jahn, and have six Christian books self-published through Create Space KDP. I have a bachelor of science degree in construction management from California State University Long Beach. I grew up in Southern California, was an avid surfer, and am fortunate enough to have always lived within one mile of the ocean. I discovered writing at the age of 30, and it is now one of my favorite activities. I am currently working on two more books on building construction.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s